Psalms 62-65

Psalms 62-65…Unmerited grace.

Studying the book of Romans before his conversion, Martin Luther felt unable to find peace with God: “My situation was that, although an impeccable monk, I stood before God as a sinner troubled in conscience, and I had no confidence that my merit would assuage Him.” At last he found the answer. “I grasped that the justice of God is that righteousness by which through grace and sheer mercy God justifies us through faith. Thereupon I felt myself to be reborn and to have gone through open doors into paradise. The whole of Scripture took on a new meaning, and whereas before the ‘justice of God’ had filled me with hate, now it became to me inexpressibly sweet in greater love.” In short, Luther had finally understood that God forgives! Salvation is not about “merit” but mercy. His feelings–of being reborn or of entering paradise–parallel the psalmist’s in today’s reading.

Psalm 65 frames this psalm of praise, particularly in verses 1-2. Verses 5–8 describe God’s awesome power over nature and nations, and verses 9–13 conclude with images of God’s blessing. These references to fertility and abundance give people more reasons to worship, even as creation itself joins in.

Verses 3–4 speak directly to what Luther described. What’s the human condition? We’re overwhelmed by sin, unable to help ourselves. We’ve been defeated. What’s the solution? “You forgave our transgressions” or “You made atonement for our transgressions.” As we’ve seen throughout the Old Testament, God’s forgiving love comes to the rescue.

Since forgiveness is part of God’s nature, when He forgives, we experience His presence and rejoice in it. The psalmist used a metaphor of living in the Lord’s house (cf. Ps. 23:6; 84:1–4). To be forgiven means to be loved, or in other words chosen. We who have been chosen by God join His family. He’s personally present in our lives, filling them with good things. To be “filled” means to be saturated, that is, fully satisfied.